Persuasive Essay Writing Prompt

Ah, Writing! This can often be the hardest piece to the puzzle.  Just think of how much we are asking our kiddos to do.  From thinking about the prompt to organizing their thoughts, to constructing a sentence,  to organizing the sentences into a paragraph or more, and then finally editing.  This is a tall order to ask even if you don't have a learning disability, but for our students, this is particularly difficult and needs to be broken down into small manageable parts.

With our writing prompts, we chunk this very large task into bite-size pieces.  With today's Freebie Friday resource we are giving you our persuasive writing prompt.  In this step by step guide, we show students how to brainstorm their ideas, organize what they have brainstormed, create their introduction and conclusion, write a rough draft and utilize the C.O.P.S. editing strategy.  

As a Smart ALEC member, you receive twice monthly emails with new writing prompts and reading comprehension support to bolster what you are doing in the classroom.  So if you like this resource you know you can find more where it came from!  

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Phonological Awareness Progress Monitoring

Progress Monitoring Sheets

We know that phonological awareness is a key foundational skill for reading. Many schools and teachers are doing a great job incorporating this instruction into the classroom. However, it can be difficult to know if the students are really getting it and if they are making progress - or if they are just "going with the flow". Students at risk for dyslexia often are slower to pick up these skills than their peers and so it's really important to be able to monitor each individual student's progress in each of the core domains of phonological awareness. The skills that we are often thinking of include:

Sentence Segmenting - The ability to break sentences into their individual words (e.g., How many words do you hear in the sentence "the cat is black").

Auditory Discrimination/Word Recognition - Telling the difference between similar sounding words (e.g., "pig - big" are these words the same or different?).

Rhyme Recognition - Knowing when two words rhyme (e.g., "Do car and star rhyme? Do truck and trip rhyme?").

Rhyme Production - Being able to produce a rhyming word when given a target word (e.g., "Tell me a word that rhymes with fan.").

Onset-Rime Blending - Being able to blend word parts together to create a real word (e.g., "Tell me what word these sounds make /sn/ /ag/.").

Initial Sound Recognition - Being able to determine the first sound in a word (e.g., "What's the first sound in bat?" Answer - /b/).

Final Sound Recognition - Being able to determine the last sound in a word (e.g., "What's the last sound in top?" Answer - /p/).

Medial Sound Recognition - Being able to determine a middle sound in a word (e.g., "What's the second sound in and?" Anwer - /n/).

Syllable Blending - Blending syllables together to create a word (e.g., "What word do these sounds make: win - dow?" Answer - window).

Syllable Segmenting - Determining how many syllables are in a word (e.g., "How many syllables do you hear in the word Sunday?" Answer - 2).

Phoneme Blending - Blending sounds together to create a word (e.g., "What word do these sounds make: /k/ /a/ /t/?" Answer - cat).

Phoneme Segmenting - Isolating the sounds within a word (e.g., "How many sounds do you hear in which?" Answer - 3).

Initial Phoneme Deletion - Being able to take the first sound out of a word (e.g., "Say slip without the /s/ sound." Answer - lip).

Final Phoneme Deletion - Being able to take the last sound out of a word (e.g., "Say meant without the /t/ sound." Answer - men).

Phoneme Manipulation - Being able to rearrange the sounds within a word (e.g., "Say the sounds in make backward." Answer - came).

This week we wanted to share a way to finally keep track of that data in small group instruction. This is great for RTI groups, small-group classroom instruction, or small group or 1:1 intervention in a school or therapy/tutoring session. If you are interested in learning more about Phonological Awareness through the lens of dyslexia consider checking out our Professional Development courses.

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Syllable Division Posters

Syllable Division Posters

Syllable Division Posters

Today we wanted to share a fun resource for teaching the different syllabication patterns. There are so many rules in Orton-Gillingham based instruction and so we wanted to find a way to make it stick more meaningfully for our students. We love trying to create memory devices and loved this traditional OG approach of using animals to help remember the different division patterns. We also have fun syllable division games available in our Members Only Library and on TPT.

Rab/bit Division - Spot and dot the vowels and divide between the consonants.

 

Rep/tile Division - Keep Magic E syllables together.

Hor/net Division - Keep Bossy R syllables together.

Ti/ger - When you cannot divide between consonants, keep the first syllable open.

Cam/el - When you cannot divide between consonants, keep the first syllable closed (we try this if an open syllable doesn't create a real word).

Tur/tle - Consonant LE, count back three and scoop.

Li/on - Typically vowel teams stick together, every once in awhile they repel and we divide between the vowels.

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Check out these other resources we use within our curriculum in our Membership site or on TPT.

 
 

Syllable Types & Vowel Sounds Interactive Notebook

This week we are so excited to share part of our interactive reading notebook and syllable marking worksheets. This is a great way to start off your systematic, structured, reading intervention. It's also a great way to keep students engaged!

Why Present It Like This?

It can be hard to remember everything there is to remember in a structured, systematic literacy program. All the vowel sounds (short, long, and R-controlled) plus all the vowel teams and syllable types. Our students enjoy coloring in the pictures and coming up with words to help them hold onto all these rules.

We know that so many of our students struggle with working memory and this has proven to be a great way to serve as a memory aid while also helping with retention of all the things there is to know related to OG. This is a short version of our more comprehensive interactive notebook available through our Membership site! Click Log-In at the top of the page to sign up!

This limited time freebie has expired.

Don't worry, you can also get these interactive notebook pages and activities as part of our Membership in the Members Only Library. Also available for purchase on TeachersPayTeachers.Or you can get this as part of our free OG Toolkit, by signing up for our e-mail list!

Syllable Type Sort

One of our favorite activities to complete with students is the syllable type sort. There are tons of fun ways to adapt this game/activity in order to determine not only if your student can decode words - but also whether they can match the word to its syllable type.

Why does this matter?

1. If a student can match a word to a syllable type, they have a greater understanding of the "why" of our language and will likely be able to generalize the skill better to other less familiar words.

2. If a student can match a word to a syllable type, they generally have a much higher likelihood of being able to spell that word correctly.

How do you play?

I always play this game as a quick warm-up with my students. I first ask them to identify all the syllable types they know. While identifying each syllable type I pull out the corresponding card. Next, I take turns picking teams with my student, or if I have a group I let each child pick a syllable type team and put the remaining cards in my pile. Every student should be able to see all the cards as they will need to sort word cards into their syllable type. I typically set my timer between 3-5 minutes as this game is meant to be a super quick review of past concepts. Everyone takes turns drawing a card and reading the word then sorting by syllable type. At the end of the game, the player with the most word cards wins!

This limited time freebie has expired.

But don't fret, you can still get this game as part of our Membership in the Members Only Library. Also available for purchase on TeachersPayTeachers.

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